Tagged ALC Mosaic

End of Year Rituals

Today was the last day of our third year at Mosaic. Over the summer I’ll still almost all of the kids at some point, so it doesn’t really feel like goodbye! I love this. The students at the school are people I enjoy being with and we have authentic relationships that extend past school hours or days.

I am excited to document our Branches end of year rituals for future reflection and sharing with other facilitators at ALCs (or similar environments). In the comments below, please share links or a sentence or two about any end of year rituals you have! I really want to see what other communities do so I can get new ideas and insights.

This year’s end of year rituals included:

  • School Report Card Creation
  • Self-Assessments
  • ALF reflections to students
  • Community Gratitude Circle

I share more details below about each component. Enjoy!

 

School Report Card

For the second year in a row, we used one of our last Change Up Meetings to evaluate our school using metrics that were important to the students and facilitators here. Last year, the kids were so engaged in this process that we excitedly did it again.

Please click here to read about this year’s report card (2015-16 school year), and click here for last year’s report card (2014-15).

 

Student Self-Assessment

In December of 2014 the students completed a self-assessment in the middle of the school year. We shared these with parents at a mid-year check-in. The assessment aimed to help the students see how they engaged with the tools and practices of the community. The hope I had in making it was for the students to understand that our ALC has tools and practices to support them in doing and learning the things they want to at school, and that they can use those structures (or help us make new ones) to support them in doing so.

As we were nearing the end of this year, I brought up the self-assessment idea to Jess during one of our staff meetings. Jess was a parent of student here for the 2014-15 school year and now is a facilitator at the school for the 2015-16 school year. Jess said that she loved the assessment tool and energetically supported it coming back. I appreciated hearing the feedback from the parent perspective, so I revamped the assessment a little and added some sections in about Self-Directed Education.

Please check out the updated 2015-16 Self-Assessment here!

Our last Change Up Meeting of the year was dedicated to filling these out. Just about all of the students were excited to do so. We told them earlier in the week that these were coming back and that we’d use our time in Change Up to do it, and they were prepared and ready for this. I handed it out and the kids went off to different parts of the room to fill it out.

I was tickled at how happy and engaged the kids were in this process. I think people enjoy having metrics to gauge how they are doing. The kids liked that they were making their own report cards for themselves. It’s important to me that if they are measuring themselves, that it’s about things that really matter to them and our community.

Another new item I added to the self-assessment was a write-in section. The kids could write-in metrics they felt were important to them. Some of the write-in’s included:

  • Happiness
  • Believing in themselves
  • Making more friends
  • Excitement
  • Funniness
  • Commitment (follow-through)
  • Trying new things
  • Listening, being polite, and helping
  • Talking to people
  • Being grateful
  • Being kind
  • Taking responsibility for myself
  • Talking in front of people

I got emotional seeing what the kids came up with as values that were important to them. They didn’t just put things that they would give themselves high marks on, many thought of things they were actually working on getting better at. It does take effort to be kind to others, because sometimes you are wrapped up in your own world and mood and you just aren’t naturally going to be kind to someone else. It takes effort to notice that and still try to be kind. It takes effort to try new things, practice gratitude, listen to others, and all of the above on this list. The students at ALC are learning how to do all of these things all the time, and I believe that this is the backbone needed for them to grow up knowing how to be in community and relationship with others. They can much more easily learn facts and algorithms than how to be reflective human beings that care about themselves and other people. 

 

ALF Reflection for Students

We sent the kids home this year with a manila envelope that had their self-assessment and a note from their Spawn Point ALF (either myself or Jess). They loved taking home what felt like a “report card.” Sometimes we “play school” here and pretend we are a school and do school-y things for fun. Every child here has exposure to a friend, book, movie, etc. that exposes them to the fact that most children in United States go to a traditional school. We can’t escape the reality that there are kids here who romanticize aspects of going to school and getting grades and going to formal classes. It’s natural for them to play out what they learn about what school is like here at ALC.

I agree with the principle of Sudbury Schools that the adults at the school should not be a child’s evaluators or judges. However, I recognize the power that relationships have, and I own my responsibility of being an older human being in the lives of the kids here. Some of them I’ve known for over three years at this point. I want the kids here to find their own value from within, not from outside of themselves and I do my best to model doing that myself. However, to think that what I say (or don’t say) doesn’t matter to them is irresponsible. I understand that who we are is always being determined in part by who we are in relationship with. We are social beings and we want to feel cared about and connected to the people in our community. Every human being has people in their lives that they respect and appreciate having attention from.

All that said, I know that most of the students here would appreciate hearing feedback from us (me and Jess) because this is just one way to show them that we respect, value and appreciate them. It’s not about us judging their worth, but taking the time to acknowledge their individual awesomeness and share how we see that light in them.

I created a sheet where Jess and I could write notes directly to each child. We added these to the self-assessments and that is what made up or “End of Year Report” for each student.

I do want to say clearly here that I would NOT recommend that the student self-assessment also be completed by an ALF for comparison. I think this would lead the student to compare their answers on this to the ALF’s answers, classifying one as right and one as wrong. This is why I made our sheet just general notes and reflections.

 

Gratitude Circle

Today we invited parents to stay a little after pick up to join us in an all-school Gratitude Circle, accompanied by delicious popsicles! Over the happy sound of slurping, we shared for the last time this school year what we were grateful for. It was wonderful to have parents join us for this, and I was working hard not to cry during some of those. This was a new ritual we decided to do this year, and one I really enjoyed!

 

I’d love to hear about what your ALC/Self-Directed Learning Community does at the end of a school year too! Please share!

ALC Mosaic 2014-15 Report Card

[Please note this is a report card from the Branches campus, not Roots!]

Report Card….Whaaaa????

Some of the kids asked me in the spring for a report card. When you are running a school with no grades, where you are hoping to foster an environment where people are intrinsically motivated, well, this may seem like an odd request.

However, I get it. People want to know how they are doing. We learn who we are in relation to our world and other people. Still, I wasn’t going to give out report cards that perpetuate a belief system that I choose not to buy into. Giving arbitrary grades for assignments – that mostly prove your ability to comply and follow directions – isn’t my style. I’d rather support children to create their own goals to meet and help them see whether or not they have achieved the goals they created.

I also wanted to have some type of end of year reflection with the kids to mark the end of the school year. I have been musing over the ideas of rites of passages and rituals that have existed in many cultures to mark the entry into a new phase of life. This journey the kids have taken with me, the rest of the staff, and their families has been one full of joy, challenges, fun & hard work. There have been hardships I want us to acknowledge in a healthy manner – to reflect on and then move forward with hope and new understandings (so we don’t repeat past mistakes), and things we’ve done really well that I want us to mark and celebrate. My goal is for us all to enter the next school year with our minds focused on what is possible & what we want for our community, rather than marred by what we didn’t do well or to just stay stagnant and repeat actions that don’t serve us.

 

Cross-Network Support

I decided to get some support and thoughts from the other ALFs in our network. I asked them if they had end-of-year rituals/routines or any ideas that may be good to try out. This led to some sharing of what we did for individual students (this year at Mosaic, we made each child their own webpage chronicling their year at school) or with the community (in NYC a community potluck is always held on the last day of school). Still, I was looking for a group activity to do with the students that would help us feel connected as a group to our community goals.

Drew began talking on the call about how it might be possible to use the community mastery board as a part of this group reflection…and as he kept speaking he planted the seed in my mind for where I could go with this for this year.

I felt grateful to have a community of Agile Learning Facilitators to bounce around this idea. It’s exactly the type of support we can provide each other through having a network of schools.

 

The Mosaic Report Card is Born

So, to give the kids an experience of evaluating self-selected goals, I conducted an activity with them at our last Change-Up meeting where we gave our school a report card.

It went like this:

“We are at the end of YEAR 2 of Mosaic!!! As a community we’ve grown and changed, and I hope we will continue to do so each year so we can create a better and more awesome school continually! I was asked by some of you for report cards this year, which I had to think carefully about before responding. You all have a reflection year-book on your blogs that we’ve made for you, but this isn’t exactly a report card. I don’t want to just assign grades or values that don’t mean anything to you.

Instead, I thought we could create a new kind of report card together, based on goals that you helped set for our school.”

I went on to show them a list they helped to create to answer “What Kind of School is Mosaic?” I did this activity with the kids in January, after I had re-watched Bruce Feiler’s TED Talk, “Agile Programing for the Family.” You can read a prior blog post I wrote about this TED Talk here.

We posted this list above our Community Mastery Board, which we use each week at our Change Up Meetings to decide what we want to work on as a community. This list is meant to serve as a reminder of what ideals we want to grow to as a community so we can be inspired to create “change-ups” to our community practices that help us move towards our self-selected goals.

So I told the kids:

“I have written all of the items on this list on sticky notes. For this Change Up Meeting, we’ll work together to evaluate how our school is doing on these goals we’ve set for the type of school we want to be.”

I then showed them a continuum on a white board. The kids at Mosaic are familiar with continuum’s to evaluate statements, so this made sense to use here.

I then divided up the kids into 3 groups (each group having several kids who can read) and distributed 3-4 stickies with each of the statements that is on our list of “What Kind of School are We?”

What Kind of School Are We?

  • The kind where we have choices
  • The kind where we go outside
  • The kind that goes on fieldtrips
  • The kind that is awesome
  • The kind where we are creative
  • The kind where we clean up
  • The kind where we can lie down if we need to when we need to
  • The kind where we’re respectful
  • The kind where everyone is friendly
  • The kind where if someone asks, “What’s wrong?” There is time to really talk about it

“I’m going to split you into groups and hand you a couple of sticky notes. You are to read them and then place them on this continuum based on how you think we are doing as a school on the particular item.”

Reading through their stickies in the small group.
Reading through their stickies in the small group.
Adding stickies to our continuum - does it "Still Need Work?" or do we "Rock This!!!?"
Adding stickies to our continuum – does it “Still Need Work?” or do we “Rock This!!!?”

The groups then decided where they would place the statements they had on our continuum. Do we still need to work on this as a community? Or do we rock at doing this? After each group was finished, we went over all of the statements as a group and decided if we wanted to move any of them. From this place, the kids naturally ended up making some suggestions for next year. I didn’t want to forget these, so I made a “Goals for Next Year” section and captured those ideas on stickies so we wouldn’t forget these ideas. Our “Mosaic Report Card” board ended up looking like this (white board smudges included!):

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Our Results, With More Detail:

We Rock This!

  • Going outside
  • Being creative
  • Going on field trips

Great!!! The kids feel that these are items that are important to what kind of school they want to be a part of. They feel we ROCK at being a community where we these items are apparent and a part of school culture. Through the cheers of the kids, it felt pretty apparent that everyone agreed we are a school that does three items!

We Are on the Way to Rocking at:

  • Having choices.

The kids have a lot of choices. But by coming to school, they do agree to attend community meetings and clean up. A part of being at school means they agree to our Student Agreement. However, I don’t think this is why the kids didn’t put this item on “We Rock At This!”

From conversations with the kids, it seems that they want more choices to be presented to them to choose from. Some kids struggle with generating ideas for activities they would like to do/participate in at school. They want to have some cool options presented. Not every child or person is good at just generating “Today I want to make a board game and I know all the steps and materials I’ll need to make that happen!” Some want some more scaffolding and support to come up with the ideas and a plan.

In addition, some have interests and desires to experience and learn many types of things, but they need more support in the steps of how to get there. For example, if a child is interested in architecture, they need support in identifying what options are available for learning and experiencing more about architecture. I see this as an opportunity for the ALFs at Mosaic to learn how to help children set and reach goals they have.

  • Cleaning Up

We’ve gotten SO MUCH better at this. Personally, in January, I began setting the intention in the morning, (in front of the kids), to be happier at clean up. I decided to stop just being frustrated or angry about how clean up was going and to just clean up happily, and from that place, generate ideas with the kids about what would make clean up easier.

What we have grown to, and has worked really well, is this structure:

On Mondays, we meet at 3pm and review clean up jobs. Each room has 3-4 clean up jobs associated with it. Children choose clean up jobs. On Mondays, they can ask to switch jobs with another kid if they are tired of their job. We swap and then review who is doing what and allow for clarification questions or conversations to happen with specific kids, i.e. “Hey, _________, I have been cleaning the room all on my own. Can you make sure to start your clean up job on time and _____ (wipe tables, sweep, etc) this week?”

The jobs have been a huge help. The whole community was excited to reflect on our growth on this particular item.

  • Being Awesome

At first, this item was placed on the continuum all the way on “We Rock This!!” One of our students, Isabella, very astutely pointed out to all of us that some items that we placed more toward the “Still Needs Work” side of the board. She thoughtfully stated that it’s kinda strange to put that we are”Rocking” at being awesome when we still need work on “being friendly” and “being respectful” to one another.  I personally noticed this but didn’t bring it up, wanting the reflection to be heavily weighed on by the input from students. I was pretty impressed that she saw this and felt comfortable to bring this up. We decided to move this back to in between “Doing OK” and “We Rock This!!”

  • We can lie down if we need to, when we need to

This led to a discussion of how, through using our CMB at Change Up Meetings, we have implemented practices as a community to allow for quiet space at school. The kids agreed that at the beginning of the year, it was loud in the building, making it hard to find a quiet space to read, rest, or just get away from noise. We have gotten so much better at this by speaking to each other about the need for quiet space at school and reminding each other to keep some type of play outside or to communicate via Set-The-Week or Daily Spawn Point when a need for reserving the big room for loud play is desired.

We are Doing Ok/On the Way to Doing Ok at:

  • Where if somone asks, “What’s Wrong?” there is time to really talk about it.
  • Being respectful
  • Being friendly

Before jumping into the conversation with kids about how they felt our community needed to work on improving these three items, I reminded them that positive culture creation is the biggest learning we have the opportunity to learn how to do at an ALC.

Most schools where I have worked simply told kids how to act and treat each other, and used behaviorism techniques to make kids “appear” respectful to one another. For example, using tickets to “pay” kids when you catch them being “good” as a way to increase the “good” behaviors you wanted to see. Or, you just keep kids so busy with worksheets that there is no time actually practice being social with one another.

In absence of a curriculum, who we are and who we show up as becomes the curriculum. We’ve learned a lot about each other as individuals, and many students have shared powerful reflections on themselves throughout the year that help us understand one another. From here, we can develop an inclusive culture that supports each other’s differences while still being a community. This is what we have the opportunity to learn how to do since we aren’t so bogged down with busy work and worksheets. We are not just individuals coming to school to have our own needs met by everyone else. We must learn to hear each other and gain a broader sense of community needs so we know how to be at school in a way that honors our individual needs, while also respecting the needs of others. Sometimes this means doing something differently than the way you imagined or having self-restraint (i.e., “Wait, I should take this soccer ball outside to play. I know that as a community we are working on having quiet space inside, and by playing soccer in the hallway, this isn’t helping our community goal).

A few students mentioned our culture committees being a support to helping kids talk though issues that feel recurring at school. Sometimes it’s just listening and then generating ideas to help empower an individual to navigate a particular social dynamic. Sometimes, we need to work with a couple of kiddos who need support to remember community agreements.

Something that has come up a bunch at the end of the year is kids excluding others from games. We’ve spent time practicing how to ask for space from others in a respectful way. “Right now, I would like to work on/play with _________. But would you like to play/do ___ at 1pm?” We are still working on how to create space for kids to play/do an activity with a small group without it feeling exclusive to others.

As a group, the kids felt that we have improved on these items and would like to continue improving on them throughout next year.

Their ideas for goals for next year?

IMG_5523

These statements either came during conversation of our report card or after when kids wanted to add items. This will be a great starting point for our first Change-Up Meeting next year when we can generate a new list of “What Kind of School Are We?” We can see the kids are really valuing feeling respected by others and feeling like everyone is friendly. Coming up with items we can practice as a community to get us to move these items from “Doing Ok” to “Rocking This” will be a high priority for us next year! How to turn these items into actionable community practices will be something I’ll be mulling over during the summer as well. I’ll also spend time brainstorming about how well this year-end reflection went with the kids and whether or not we should do something different next year. Fortunately I’ll be spending 4 weeks with a bunch of really amazing and radical educators that I get to learn and play with 🙂

 

Trip to the Vet

We are just returning from a trip to the Veterinarian and I’ve asked the students who came on the trip to blog their reflections right after while it’s still fresh on their minds. Since one thing we believe in is “medium is the message,” I’m also going to blog about the experience!

This trip came out of a winter project @Alona and I started where we looked up careers and what it took to be those careers and how much money you’d make if you had the career. One career Alona expressed interest in was being a veterinarian. She loves animals! I shared with her how I also wanted to be a vet when I was young but that when I realized you had to cut them open and perform surgery as a vet, I then changed my mind around 18.  I volunteered at a vet office for one day and someone brought in a box of dead kittens – it was one of those moments I realized that being a vet is not just about seeing cute animals. There’s a lot of hard work and you’ve got to have the ability to do and see things that may make you upset.

I asked Alona if she’d be interested in interviewing a vet and she was really excited about doing that. So I emailed Daisy’s vet, Dr. Wheelock from Dilworth Animal Hospital, and got a quick response of “YES” to allowing the kids to interview him and get a tour.

Before our visit, the @Alonalearning, @sassygirl26, @hermoine, and @reagan met and came up with questions. I emailed them to Dr. Wheelock and he printed out our email and had those ready to answer when we got there! Here’s briefly what I remember as his answers, summarized through my lens:


 

Is it painful seeing the animals going through getting shots and surgery? It can be, but when you know that what you are doing is ultimately helping the animal, you feel good about it. 
Does it really really feel bad if you fail? Yes it can. You have to be able to admit when you don’t know what is wrong with an animal. Even if a person can afford all the tests to try to figure out what is wrong with an animal, sometimes you still don’t know the answer. It can feel like failure, but really you can’t look at it that way. You just have to try to do the best you can.  
Did you ever doubt you could perform surgery or give shots to animals? I can’t really remember his response to this question. 
What age were you when you realized you wanted to be a vet? Dr. Wheelock said he wanted to be a vet when he was a kid. He added that now as an adult, he realizes how hard it actually is to be a vet – that’s something he didn’t know as a kid. 
What did you have to do to become a vet? Dr. Wheelock said he needed really good grades in high school and then to graduate college. After getting his 4 year degree he applied to vet school, which lasts 4 years. If you want to specialize in a particular field – like studying lab samples, then you have to do even more school, maybe 2-8 more years. He also told us that getting into vet school is harder than getting into human medical school – but the difference is that once you are in, it’s pretty typical that you finish vet school. In human medical school they work to weed you out through the program so many people never finish medical school.
What is the most difficult type of animal or animals to work on or diagnose? Why? Zoo animals are really hard, like tigers, because you have to try to treat them without getting hurt yourself or having them hurt themselves. It’s also hard to treat pets that don’t want you near them, like an angry, sick dog that is trying to bite you. He said you have to be really creative in figuring out how to treat animals in these circumstances. 
What is your favorite type of animal to work on? Why? While Dr. Wheelock admits that puppies and kittens are cute and fun to work on, he feels that older animals are the most fun to work with. He says you can look into their eyes and see that they have personalities and have lived.
 
Was there ever an animal that you couldn’t diagnose? What happened? This was kinda covered in the failure question.

Here are some pictures from our visit:
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Waiting in the reception area to meet the vet!

 

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We got to see a dog under anesthesia getting his teeth cleaned. He told us about teeth care and what they have to do while he is under to keep him safe. There is a tube going to his lungs so that if he stops breathing they can keep pumping oxygen into his body.
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We went into the X-ray room and saw a lizard full of eggs! The owner was wondering why it wasn’t eating, but the lizard was just too full of eggs it was about to lay!
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You cant see this from the picture, but right behind Dr. Wheelock is a box full of samples taken from animals to be examined by the lab to see if the samples are benign or malignant. We are right outside the main surgery room here.

I am so thankful for Dr. Wheelock’s time with us! I have always loved this animal hospital for Daisy, but now I’m even more in love with this place 🙂

This week in review

I’m enjoying the efforts @Lacy and I have been making to collaborate more. (Lacy started this beautiful school with me and several other families throughout 2013, and now runs the ALC Mosaic early childhood program). She’s someone I admire a lot and miss seeing on a daily basis. One day I hope the school can be housed in one big plot of land, with trees, water, several buildings, and the homes of those who want to live on the property. Then the kids of all ages can have more opportunities to mingle, as well as the staff.

Lacy invited us to join the Roots crew this week at Reedy Creek Park, and I jumped at the opportunity to make this work! I offered this at Set the Week, and every kid at the meeting wanted to go.

At the park, I found out that they have homeschool classes for only $3 a person, a nature center, hiking trails, and an awesome outdoor play area! I couldn’t believe it was my first time ever visiting the park, and I know it won’t be my last. I also got to see some of the kids I was with daily last year that I don’t get to see any more. I loved seeing how much they have grown and changed!

Some other highlights from the park:

Dean and I took 16 kids on a hike through the woods! We were looking for some abandoned structure, but ended up making a giant loop instead. Despite not finding what we set out for, it was so wonderful to get to be in the woods!
Dan and the kids found geocaches – they were all over the park!
We officially have left our mark on the geocache!
It was so fun to see interactions between the younger and older kids. These two has a blast together!

Lacy and I also emailed a bit about Valentine’s day – both of us hadn’t really planned anything big for the kids, nor did we really seem jazzed to do so. Valentine’s has never been a big deal to me, and I also don’t like fostering the culture of, “How many Valentine’s did I get?” or building their own sense of self-worth around who gives them a little card with hearts on it. The other way I’ve seen it done at schools is to force everyone to give everyone else a card, and I guess that’s better, but…I guess I didn’t really care to do much about Valentines at school unless the kids really pushed for something, which they weren’t doing.

Lacy said that, while she didn’t feel an authentic connection to Valetine’s day, she’d think about doing a heart-self-love ritual. I thought that was the perfect thing to do! I printed out pictures of all the kids and glued those on heart cut-outs and set out on Thursday to share with the kids.

Valentine’s self-love hearts

It was so much fun! Most of them were able to do it Thursday, and hopefully I’ll catch the others on Monday. I hung up the hearts on the doors to the library and office so everyone can see them as they walk in! As we worked on them, kids would ask each other, “What do you love about me?” We all had fun thinking of qualities that we loved about each other, and that helped get us started because when someone asks you to say what you love about yourself, you might feel like you aren’t supposed to say an answer (because then you are bragging). What I was hoping to convey here is that appreciating who we are, identifying what we are great at and the wonderful qualities we have isn’t bragging or being conceited. We can allow ourselves to love who we are, and when we feel really good about who we are, we tend to look for the good in others. Doing these with the kids was my favorite offering of the week! Hearing the kids really look at others thoughtfully to help them think of what to write was so sweet. Some snippets of conversations that happened: 

  • Student 1: “I love your humor” Student 2: “Thank you! I wanted to say that, but I didn’t know if anyone else would think that too!”
  • Me (to a student): “What do you love about yourself?” Student: “Well, I love ME!” as they write the word “ME” in big letters on their heart.
  • When I was getting started and needed some help to do so, one student said that they appreciated my ability to plan trips or things to do for school, which warmed my heart – I don’t think “planning ability” would’ve been something I would have thought to write on my heart, but it is something that I do a lot for school and love that others notice and appreciate! I happily wrote this down 🙂
  • Student A: “What do you love about me?” Student B: “Well, I don’t know how to say this in a short sentence, but man you are so good at finding a new game and then mastering really quickly!” I could that student A in this situation felt just as I did in bullet point 3, having been noticed for skill they enjoy being good at doing.

Finally, my week of school ended with Valentine’s Foot Scrub! @Sassygirl26 wants to make her own cooking show videos, and we happened to have a parent donation of foot scrub ingredients to test out how to make a step by step video. We thought this would be great practice for when she got started with her cooking shows! We used my iphone and then I got a simple iPhone video editor. I needed to see if I could take short segments of video and then use an editor to merge the videos together – this way we could stop and start shooting for each step of a process. If I can’t shoot film in short segments, we would have a long messy video with us trying to not mess up any part.

Fortunately, my $1.99 app called Videoshop did the trick and we have our first How-To film up and ready for your viewing pleasure!

 

On Friday, school was closed so I flew up to NYC and visited Agile Learning Centers, our NYC home base. I loved walking into school Friday afternoon during blog time! The school was quiet and the energy was calm. The ALFs and kids were spread out around the school blogging. They have more teens than we do, so they can write their own blogs independently. There was a volunteer helping a younger student complete their blog.

This made me think – what if I let parents know that we would welcome them into the school from 12-1pm to partner with a child who isn’t reading/writing fluently and help them complete a reflective blog post? Even just having 1-2 extra adults around to sit with a child one on one would be amazing. I am excited to talk to @Charlotte and @Dthomasson about this idea next week!

Now I’m still in NYC after taking a silversmithing workshop at Liloveve where @Tomis and I made our wedding bands! They look wonderful, and I’m so glad we tried this out. At one point I thought I ruined his band (we each made the other’s band). I held the torch gun on the band for too long when soldering it together and melted a portion of it. Fortunately this was fixable and his band ended up looking great! Not only do we have rings with a story, I’ve learned a new skill that I hope to try out again. One of our former teachers, Lindsey, is a silversmith with her own studio. I hope to try out jewelry making with her soon, and possibly, with older kids who are interested.

Our bands!

Tomorrow @Tomis and I fly back to Charlotte to begin his two week stay at the school. I’m looking forward to having him back at school and to looking through an email from @Lacy where we’ll coordinate more whole school trips between our campuses for the rest of the spring 🙂